Fighting Anger

Edward Carbajal
3 min readAug 29, 2019
Photo: Ed Carbajal

There was a lot to take away from Conor McGregor when he spoke with Ariel Helwani on Sports Center a couple of weeks ago. Since I write about the sport, I watched it twice because there was a lot in what they spoke about to take in. While I mostly write about the fights, I could not help but notice something familiar in McGregor’s apology.

Watching him apologize, I could not help but notice something familiar in his words and tone. The way he seemed to struggle and almost feel the need to remind himself of what training in martial arts is supposed to do in making people better. “That’s not the reason I got into martial arts, I got into martial arts to defend against that,” McGregor said. He said he has been making efforts to correct his behavior, the reactions to things that have had him in the news.

I know the feeling since I was someone that had issues with my temper when I was younger. It’s definitely a behavior that has to be unlearned and from my own experience, I know recognizing the problem is only the first step. You have to do something about it once you know the problem exists. I sought out a way to fix it.

I went to anger management for a year, and along with keeping a journal and learning to recognize the difference between instant reactions and being present in a moment enough to not make a big deal out of things, picked up a book to supplement the therapy.

“Beyond Anger: A Guide for Men”, by Dr. Thomas J. Harbin was probably more help than the therapy. When I asked a friend about therapy, he said, “You get out of it what you put in,” so I figured I would do more than going to therapy and make notes. Dr. Harbin’s book really helped a lot so when I saw McGregor on TV, knowing he is younger than me and likely has to find his own way, I recommended the book.

--

--

Edward Carbajal

Interests in Martial Arts, Literature, Civil War History, Horror. Contributor to; Sherdog, MyMMAnews.com, One37 PM & TheBlogboardJungle.com